Commercial Solar Systems 101: A Simple Guide

All businesses should be looking to reduce their energy consumption and electricity spend wherever they can. A commercial solar system is a great way to do this in an economical way, without having to change the way your...

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Very strong words in The Age about how Victorians, who made the move to solar in huge numbers, are now being "ripped off" by the loss of the feed-in-tariff.  They get paid 5 to 7¢, only to see utilities on-sell that power for up to 29¢   This is obviously very unfortunate.  That said, in the commercial solar space this isn't really an issue --though better regulation, more consistent energy approaches and a path to a future where the grid works for everyone is at the top of our agenda!  Read the story here:

. . . Victorians with rooftop solar are being ripped off. The state Labor government recently ended the Transitional Feed-in Tariff (TFiT) scheme and the Standard Feed-in Tariff scheme (SFiT). Over the past five years, these schemes had ensured solar owners were paid at least 25¢ per kilowatt hour for energy they fed back into the grid.

But since January 1, these households are now paid between 5 and 7¢ – even though electricity companies can on-sell that very same electricity for up to 29¢ per kilowatt hour. This means your power company can now pay you 5¢ for solar energy you produce, and then charge your neighbour 29¢ per kilowatt hour for using it, even though the electrons have only travelled next door.

It's a greedy mark-up that only serves to line the pockets of power companies, and it's being facilitated by the Victorian government. So why is the government doing this, when it should want to encourage renewable energy?

Partly it's due to governments – both Labor and Liberals – cowing to the demands of profit-hungry electricity companies who are chasing the bottom line before the coal industry inevitably closes up shop. And partly it's due to a lack of vision from governments who can't seem to imagine our electricity system being any different to how it is now.

Read the rest of the story here.

Written by
Huon Hoogesteger

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